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The Canadian Shield

Covering about one-half of all of Canada is the nation's oldest landform feature, which also holds Earth's most ancient of rock – the Canadian Shield. Formed in the Precambrian Eon, the rock we are looking at today was once the basement of mountain ranges and volcanoes that have since eroded away over the last few billions of years.
   Today, deposits of metallic minerals such as gold, silver, copper, nickel, zinc, iron, etc., dot the landscape. Single-industry mining towns and forestry mill towns are scattered randomly across the huge expanse of the Shield as are hunting camps and remote lodges. It is to the Shield that millions of Canadians retreat each summer to cottages and remote parks to capture that wilderness spirit lost in the expanse of cities and suburbs in the south.

View from Peat Mountain, Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario
It's easy to forget the Canadian Shield is over a billion years old and over 3 billion years old in some places. These ragged-looking rocky ridges were once mountains higher than the Himalayas.
View from Peat Mountain, Lake Superior Provincial Park, Ontario
It's easy to forget the Canadian Shield is over a billion years old and over 3 billion years old in some places. These ragged-looking rocky ridges were once mountains higher than the Himalayas.
Dawn, Little Blackstone Lake, The Massasauga Provincial Park, Ontario
Having been gouged and scraped clean by glaciers, the depressions of the Canadian Shield are now millions of lakes making it a summer paradise for canoeists.
Dawn, Little Blackstone Lake, The Massasauga Provincial Park, Ontario
Having been gouged and scraped clean by glaciers, the depressions of the Canadian Shield are now millions of lakes making it a summer paradise for canoeists.
George Lake Monolith and La Cloche Range, Morning, Killarney Provincial Park, Ontario
The 2.5-billion-year-old, white quartzite of the La Cloche Range contrasts with the 1.75-billion-year-old pink granite of the Killarney batholith.
George Lake Monolith and La Cloche Range, Morning, Killarney Provincial Park, Ontario
The 2.5-billion-year-old, white quartzite of the La Cloche Range contrasts with the 1.75-billion-year-old pink granite of the Killarney batholith.
Dawn Mist, Haliburton, Ontario
Dawn Mist, Haliburton, Ontario
Lake Superior Shore, Ontario
Eroded headlands and rocky shores are typical of all the lakes on the Canadian Shield.
Lake Superior Shore, Ontario
Eroded headlands and rocky shores are typical of all the lakes on the Canadian Shield.
Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario is a mecca for summer canoeists and campers and winter skiers and dog-sledders.
Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario is a mecca for summer canoeists and campers and winter skiers and dog-sledders.
Winter, George Lake Monolith and La Cloche Range, Killarney Provincial Park, Ontario
As beautiful in winter as it is in summer, Killarney has become a popular winter camping and nordic ski area.
Winter, George Lake Monolith and La Cloche Range, Killarney Provincial Park, Ontario
As beautiful in winter as it is in summer, Killarney has become a popular winter camping and nordic ski area.
Canoeing the Lake Superior Shore
Given the potentially rough conditions along Lake Superior's west coast, it is more typical to see kayakers, but canoeists also venture out, especially in the quieter bays.
Canoeing the Lake Superior Shore
Given the potentially rough conditions along Lake Superior's west coast, it is more typical to see kayakers, but canoeists also venture out, especially in the quieter bays.
Classic Boreal Forest, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario
Not only is the Canadian Shield a storehouse of metallic minerals, it is covered by millions of hectares of merchantable timber feeding the newsprint and lumber industry.
Classic Boreal Forest, Algonquin Provincial Park, Ontario
Not only is the Canadian Shield a storehouse of metallic minerals, it is covered by millions of hectares of merchantable timber feeding the newsprint and lumber industry.
Clearcut, Northern Ontario
The unfortunate result of large-scale forestry in Canada and large swaths of clear-cut forest. The forestry industry tells us that this mimics forest loss through forest fire when really, it's done for purely economic reasons.
Clearcut, Northern Ontario
The unfortunate result of large-scale forestry in Canada and large swaths of clear-cut forest. The forestry industry tells us that this mimics forest loss through forest fire when really, it's done for purely economic reasons.
A classic view of the Canadian Shield with rocks and trees and water.
A classic view of the Canadian Shield with rocks and trees and water.
This horizontal mine shaft - called an adit - is below Sudbury, Ontario - one of the world's largest producers of nickel and copper as a result of its location in the Sudbury Basin - the world's second-largest impact crater.
This horizontal mine shaft - called an adit - is below Sudbury, Ontario - one of the world's largest producers of nickel and copper as a result of its location in the Sudbury Basin - the world's second-largest impact crater.
The Sudbury Superstack is associated with Inco's Copper Cliff processing facility – the largest nickel smelting operation in the world. It is the tallest chimney in the Western Hemisphere and Canada's second-tallest free-standing structure after the CN Tower.
The Sudbury Superstack is associated with Inco's Copper Cliff processing facility – the largest nickel smelting operation in the world. It is the tallest chimney in the Western Hemisphere and Canada's second-tallest free-standing structure after the CN Tower.

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